Pure Madness

My thoughts on the "behind the scenes" of life. You will find inspiration here. Share it generously


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In Your Dreams!

I am such a dreamer. I believe in extra ordinary possibilities. Yes, the line between faith and dreaming is probably very thin but what if there is a place for both? Of course I would like to be more of a faith person, it’s socially (and religiously) acceptable but I have to admit I am a dreamer.

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Being a dreamer is often looked at in bad light. If you walk up to a lady, (forget all the courage us guys need to muster before doing so,) and propose something you consider “extra ordinary.” Wouldn’t her most likely response to your foolish courage be “dream on” or “in your dreams”? Oh, and don’t forget that if you don’t approach her she will consider you a coward. We have to choose which title to live with when it comes to the ladies and most of the time it’s both a dreamer and a coward in equal measure.

I love dreaming. My mind is so animated that at times I feel like a young boy who still believes anything is possible. I thought this would stop once I hit my “thates” but every now and then in broad daylight I will catch myself dreaming. My dreams are so random that I cannot indulge you in such childish thoughts. I have however always thought of dreams as a precursor to faith which leads to action.

Do you dream? Have you ever dreamt of something very silly like having super powers? Powers that would make you uproot the corruption and poverty in this country? Have you ever dreamt that you had super powers to expose injustices and those behind it? Have you ever dreamt of being able to see people’s intentions and thoughts (especially our leaders?) Don’t you ever dream of being able to make “deserving” people’s lives better? Being able to pay school fees and hospital bills and take entire families for holiday? Am sure you have dreamt of sinking boreholes and discovering precious stones that would make Kenya a self-sufficient, wealthy nation.

Well, if you have ever dreamt of free, excellent education and health care, access to clean water and better sanitation for all Kenyans, better roads, no traffic, safe (not safer) neighborhoods, an efficient judicial system that defends the rights of all Kenyans and punishes all crimes evenly regardless of who commits the crime, if you have ever dreamt of better living conditions and low cost of living for every one including yourself, you are not alone and it’s not unusual. Far from it.

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What if destiny uses these “silly dreams” as a way of reminding us when we are settling for less? What if what we so quickly brush off as stupid dreams are seeds of faith germinating in us? What if our hearts and minds have a way of showing us the possibilities available for us if only we can dream? What if dreams are the future’s way of cheering us on to want and desire better than what we are getting now? What if dreams are our true voices speaking back at us, affirming what we believe but are fearful to reach out?

Imagine if we were crazy enough to dream. Imagine if you and I dreamt of better services from our government and the leaders we vote for. Imagine if we dreamt that our leaders in any capacity would do whatever it takes to be the best they can to deliver services to those under them. Imagine if we dreamt of refusing to pay bribes and being heroes enough to admit and pay the price for our mistakes. Imagine if we dreamt of standing up for what is right at whatever cost.

Imagine if we dreamt of ourselves being the change we want to see in our country. Imagine if we dreamt of ourselves being good citizens who are so proud of their country and each other that they defend it with everything they have. Imagine if we dreamt of leaving behind a dreaming legacy for our children and their children. Imagine if we dreamt of ourselves seeing our dreams come true.

I know what you are thinking “dream on” and “yeah, in your dreams.” But what if dreams are the future’s way of reminding us that everything is possible, if only we believe in our dreams? Dream on!

Eleanor Roosevelt’s once said “the future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”

Edits by Wanjiku Kimaru


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Death Announcement!

It is with deep sorrow that we announce the sad and untimely death of our dear friend, Courage. Until his death, Courage has been living in our hearts from birth. He will be joining his kin faith, hope, trust, optimism, confidence self-belief, sacrifice who passed on a while ago. Courage leaves behind fear, self-doubt, limitations, cowardice, timidity and faint-heartedness.

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Courage will be remembered for energizing many hearts to keep believing even when all hope was lost. He was there when we were fighting for our independence. He made the freedom fighters intolerant of injustices that were happening at the time. It is because of him that the freedom fighters sacrificed their lives and took an oath not to relent until the generations that would come after them were free to be whoever they wanted.

Courage will also be remembered for leading men and women into fighting for democracy in Kenya. He is the one who kept them from giving up when they were tortured and humiliated for taking a stand. It was Courage that reminded these men and women what they were fighting for. He showed them that even though some would lose their lives in the process, their posterity would enjoy the fruits of a democratic country.

Courage will also be remembered for walking with individuals like the late Wangari Maathai who fought greedy and self-centered individuals and organizations that were hell bent on robbing future generations of their inheritance; a safe, clean and functional eco system. Today we enjoy the benefits of her sacrifice and our children will grow up in a clean, unpolluted environment.

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You will remember Courage when he walked with individuals like the late John Michuki who dreamt of a safer public transport system. He put his foot down and refused to give in to pressure from the stakeholders in the sector. Today, his legacy lives on; public transport is orderly, safer and more comfortable than we could have ever imagined.

Before his demise, Courage has also been living in heroes and heroines who are still alive today. He was living in the GSU officer who chose to reason with rioters during the post-election violence period instead of using violence. Courage was at the center of the people who fought for this country to have a new constitution. He was in leaders who resigned from high positions because they did not want to be part of “the rot.” Unlike the famous “I’d rather die than resign” kind of leaders we are used to

Courage, if you can remember, has over the years put Kenya in the global map as he inspired many athletes to push themselves enough to win races and marathons. He has restored the pride we have in our country when our athletes have carried the Kenyan flag high every year. From the track to the swimming pool to the volleyball court the Kenyan flag has continued to soar.

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You too interacted with Courage a couple of times and can tell of his friendship. When you went out to demonstrate and demand justice over grabbed land, justice for rape victims and other seemingly ‘small’ injustices. You refused to keep quiet when something was not right. You let your voice be heard and when it wasn’t you, joined like-minded individuals to make it even louder. You brought the fight for justice home and into your networks, including social media. Any platform you got, you raised your voice and demanded justice. Thanks to Courage, your voice was heard, and you made a difference.

It took courage for you to wake up early that election morning to go vote for a new constitution and for a leader you believed in. You believed in the need for change and you actioned your belief. You chose leaders who had the courage to declare that they had what it would take to change the status quo. Courage made you see the benefits of your choice and you took the risk.

In his last days however, Courage lived a very lonely life. We all abandoned him and made deals with his enemies; fear and selfish ambition. We soon became cowards who only thought about themselves. We refused to respond to people who cried for our help and told ourselves that it was someone else’s responsibility. We built higher walls around our homes and around ourselves to keep people out.

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We soon joined networking forums not to offer others anything but to find out what they could offer us. We became selfishly competitive to the point of sabotaging colleagues so that we would look good. We stopped being courteous on the roads or anywhere else. Our selfishness became so severe that we started selling out our country and freedom to the highest bidder or just any bidder. We turned our back and hid our faces to injustices. We hid in our religious institutions saddened by how evil seemed to be thriving around us wondering what ill equipped simple people like ourselves could do in such times. Soon our country became the prey for terrorists, rapists thugs and land grabbers. We saw evil but shut our mouths to it and slowly Courage grew weaker and weaker.

Our leaders stopped listening to Courage. They forgot that Courage had once taught them that they were the heroes chosen by the people to fight injustices in society. They too became “crowds for hire” even at the cost of the mwananchi. They unanimously appointed a public servants who played to their tune and turned down qualified personnel that would bring the much needed change in the country. They ganged up and looted the country at any given chance.

So dear brethren, we are gathered here today to say goodbye to our departed friend. Our unsung hero who lived his latter years as a lonely, abandoned old man despite all that he helped us achieve over the years as individuals and as a country. Let us take this time to honor him by remembering all that we have lost in the demise of a dear friend, Courage.

(Moment of silence)

Edited by Wanjiku Kimaru


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The Mau Mau Struggle – General Smart Memoir

“Mzee Kenyatta would have preferred a less violent way but enough was enough. There was no stopping us. We were under oath, we were ready to die. In fact, we had sworn that we would rather all die and let the mzungu have no one to rule. Those who broke their oath and betrayed our cause died and those who did not still suffer the consequences to date. We were long dead before the begun rebellion.”

Stanley Muriithi (General Smart) gives an account of his life as a Mau Mau fighter

Stanley Muriithi (General Smart) gives his an account of his life as a Mau Mau

It’s a cold night in Nyeri and we (The Nyoras – My Extended Family) are sitting under a tent attentively listening. The ladies are cooking at an open kitchen near the main house as the men roast meat near the tent. We cuddle together under the few blankets available feeling guilty that the old but upright-standing man in front of us is only wearing a suit. As he introduces himself, you can see most of his teeth are intact. He pauses every so often to smile and laugh heartily. Obviously, he is a happy man. As he begins to tell his story, we all lean in as if attempting to see his words.

Stanley Muriithi, known by the Mau Mau as General Smart, introduces himself first as a Born Again Christian who prays daily; that after he has fought the good fight here on earth, that he would be found worthy by God of the next life. That has become sole his purpose of living. Before he tells us how he joined the Mau Mau movement, he begins by telling us a brief history of how the white man, popularly referred to as ‘Mzungu’ ended up in Kenya. Stanley’s father, Mukabi, was employed by Delamare, a wealthy Mzungu from Gilgil. He got his name “Arm Bearer” from the fact that he had learned how to use a gun to keep off wild animals while he looked after Delamare’s cattle. In those days Africans were allowed to keep livestock but the white settlers kept pushing them further and further from their homes after which they would fence off the land as their own. Within a short time, the white man had amassed huge chunks of land and the local Africans had been displaced.

When the young men who had enrolled to fight in the World War finally came back home and found that their parents had been displaced and their farms taken over by white settlers, they were deeply troubled. It took most of them years to reconnect with their families. The fact that they did not get the hefty perks they had been promised when they enrolled to fight made things even harder. They were furious. They would later form a party Kenya African Union (KAU) to fight for their rights. Mzee Kenyatta was sent abroad by this party to plead the case of Africans and the injustices they were suffering under the arms of the white settlers.

Freedom fighters Mzee Jomo Kenyatta with Musa Mwariama. (Photo Courtesy of www.nipate.com)

Freedom fighters Mzee Jomo Kenyatta with Musa Mwariama. (Photo Courtesy of http://www.nipate.com)

On 12thNovember 1951, Mzee Kenyatta met the Mau Mau movement in Kiganjo. They took him to a granary, where they hid their weapons. When Mzee Kenyatta saw the weapons he asked his colleague and confidant Mzee Jesse Kariuki, “What are these for?” Mzee Jesse explained Mau Mau’s resolve to rebel against the mzungu and told Kenyatta that every one of those 626 guns he was looking at had an owner who was under oath and was ready to die for the cause.

This resolve by the Mau Mau made Mzee Kenyatta even more confident on his mission. To gauge how prepared the Mau Mau were on this cause he would constantly ask them, “If I hold the donkey’s head will you bear its violent kicks?” To which the Mau Mau would respond unanimously, “Yes we will!” Mzee Kenyatta would then ask, “Do you know that an oath cannot be quenched with water?” To which the Mau Mau would answer “Yes. It can only be quenched by blood.”

The Mau Mau devised a strategy that would paralyze the economy. No one would buy any products sold or produced by the mzungu. From cigarettes to popular hats worn by men. If whatever one wanted was not provided by a native, then the alternative was to get it from an Indian shop. Alarmed, the colonial government responded by announcing a state of emergency and started arresting people who were aligned to the Mau Mau. Many were arrested while others beheaded.

This however did not deter the Mau Mau’s resolve for independence. As the Mau Mau prepared to leave their homes and go into the forest, leaders were identified to take charge of different groups. Young men were in charge of recruiting new people to take the oath and join the movement while women would cook and take the food to different groups in the forest. Well-equipped make shift hospitals run by police doctors were established for those who would get hurt in battle.

Freedom Fighter Dedan Kimathi is handed his leopard-gazelle hide regalia after he was arrested. He was later hanged at Kamiti

Freedom Fighter Dedan Kimathi with his leopard skin regalia after he was arrested. He was later hanged at Kamiti

As the battle raged on, some of the Mau Mau who had taken the oath went back on their word and not only surrendered but also sold out their counter parts. Many of the Mau Mau who had been exposed were arrested and detained, while others were hung.

General Smart, who was in charge of the armory evaded arrest a couple of times in which he credits to God watching over him. He recounted how he used to carry a gun (Ka-minor) tucked in between his thighs. One time, the soldiers came looking for him accompanied by local teachers who knew him well. They asked everyone to line up and show their identity. Even though the teachers knew General Smart very well they could not identify him.

The soldiers then started checking everyone’s identity cards. General Smart knew his time had come and unbuttoned the guns sheath ready to fire. When they came across a man named Kimathi, they assumed that it was one of the most wanted Mau Mau leader Dedan Kimathi. They all ambushed him in a bid to find out who he really was. While they were all distracted, General Smart slowly walked over to the other side where the soldiers had already checked the IDs. When they finally realized that it wasn’t Dedan Kimathi, they went on to check the remaining IDs oblivious of the fact that General Smart had already moved to the front of the line. Another time as he was being chased by the soldiers carrying two guns he hid under a Somali woman’s dress as she sat outside her house braiding her hair.

General Smart was eventually captured after a colleague exposed him. Mzungu soldiers accompanied by the home guards arrested him and after his colleague identified him, he was shot and left for the dead. The last thing he remembers before blacking out was the smell of fried meat. He was unconscious for four days. When he regained consciousness he woke up to find himself lying under dead bodies with safari ants and flies everywhere. It took another three days for him to get help. Jackals and hyenas would sniff him and walk away as elephants made a stop at a nearby tree, every so often to scratch themselves.

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After nine days with the dead General Smart was rescued and even before he learnt how to walk again the colonial soldiers came back for him and demanded that he shows them where the Mau Mau hid their weapons. He was later taken to Kapenguria prison for almost a year after which he and 26 other prisoners were later transferred to Mackinnon Road detention camp in 1954 where all sorts of inhumane torture was administered. While at Mackinnon, many Mau Mau’s died from typhoid and other diseases because they were forced to stay naked as they served their sentence. General Smart remained in detention for six years.

Even though independence eventually came, it was not without a cost. Thousands of lives were lost and a lot of blood was shed. General Smart talked in depth about many of his experience that cannot be put into words. But as he concluded his talk, we could not help but wonder what happened along the way because today Kenyans live their lives way below the standards that Stanley Muriithi – General Smart – and others fought and lost their lives for. They certainly did not lose their lives for us to be selfish and corrupt enough to sell our country at any cost.

The likes of General Smart and other unsung freedom heroes lay down their lives to ensure we, their descendants, live a better life. What are you and I ready to lay down our lives to defend so that our children and their children may live a better life than we are?

Edited by Wanjiku Kimaru

To listen to the Gen. Smart’s narration (in Kikuyu) click on the link below: